+ 1 (775)-251-8078 Academicians2012@gmail.com

This is the first lab report of ” civil engineering material” please follow the attachments and the data. everything is included.
ce_330_fall_2019_schedule___lab_report_outline___copy.docx
coarse_and_fine_aggregate.docx
coarse_aggregate_and_fine_aggregate_data_sheet.docx
Unformatted Attachment Preview
CE 330 Civil Engineering Materials Lab (Fall 2019)
Tuesday – 2:00 PM to 3:50 PM / Thursday- 9 AM to 10:50 AM
Sandeep Burra (burra@siu.edu)
Mailbox: CEE dept. office (has my last name on it)
Office EGRD 29
Office Hours: Tuesday 1-2 PM & Thursday 11 AM – 12 PM or by appointment
Tentative Lab Schedule
1) Introduction
2) Coarse & Fine Aggregate
3) Cement sitting time
4) Asphalt
5) Wet concrete
6) Compression/Tension Tests to concrete samples (7th day)
7) Timber + Compression/Tension Tests to concrete samples (14th day)
8) Cured Concrete (28th day)
9) Concrete beam flexural
There will be a quiz before each lab. The quiz will be 15% of the total lab grade, report will be
70%, and final exam will be 15%.
Labs are due by the start of the session on the dates indicated. Labs have to be submitted in class
(Hard Copy)
The lab you submit must match the formatting provided by the T.A. or half credit will be given.
1” Margins, double spacing, and Arial font size 16 and 12 shall be used. A descriptive example is
attached.
Each lab is worth 200 points except the Wet & cured concrete lab is worth 400 pts. Scoring for
each will be as indicated on the attached example lab.
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY AT CARBONDALE
DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
CE 330: CIVIL ENGINEERING MATERIALS LABORATORY
SECTION NUMBER: 00X
LAB NAME
LAB NUMBER: X
DATE PERFORMED: Month XX, 2017
SUBMITTED BY: Your Name
DATE SUBMITTED: Month XX, 2017
TA: Sandeep Burra
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cover (10 pts)…………………………………………………………………………………..1
Table of Contents (10 pts)…………………………………………………………………….2
Scope (20 pts)………………………………………………………………………………….3
Significance (30 pts)……………………………………………………………………………X
Apparatus (20 pts)………………………………………………………………………..……X
Procedure (20 pts)……………………………………………………………………………..X
Calculations (20 pts)………………………………………………………… …………………X
Results (30 pts)…………………………………………………………………………………X
Conclusion (40 pts)…………………………………………………………………………….X
SCOPE
The scope of the report should state the purpose of the lab, the materials tested
and the properties being tested for.
SIGNIFICANCE
This section should describe the importance of the experiment to a civil engineer.
State the practical applications of the properties being tested for.
APPARATUS
Number and list all the instruments and machines used in the process of the lab.
Attach drawings or pictures as needed.
PROCEDURE
List the steps of the procedure, include all of the information necessary to
complete the lab. If multiple tests are performed, break the different procedures up
separately with the necessary sub-headings.
CALCULATIONS
Type all equations with variables as well as a typed sample equation showing
values obtained in the lab used in the experiment like so: 𝑥 =
−𝑏±√𝑏 2 −4𝑎𝑐
2𝑎
You can do
this in 2013 Microsoft Word by going to “Insert” and selecting “object” and then choosing
“Microsoft Equation 3.0” from the list. In 2007 Microsoft Word you go to “insert” and
then select the “equation” tab on the right. You must also identify all the variables and
their units.
RESULTS
Show all data recorded in class and all the calculated values. Please organize
this data into tables and charts. Properly title and label all axes, graphs, tables etc. Do
NOT attach the raw data sheets obtained in class.
Table 1 : Load and deflection data for all three types of beams
Load(Ib)
RECTANGULAR
LOAD
DEFLECTION
100
0.065
200
0.089
300
0.108
400
0.121
500
0.135
600
0.141
SMALL I-BEAM
LOAD
DEFLECTION
100
0.103
200
0.138
300
0.162
400
0.183
500
0.202
600
0.218
5000
4500
4000
3500
3000
2500
2000
1500
1000
500
0
BIG I-BEAM
LOAD
DEFLECTION
100
0.059
200
0.085
300
0.105
400
0.121
500
0.136
600
0.15
0.792, 4430
0.681, 3300
0.959, 3600
RECTANGULAR
SMALL I-BEAM
BIG I-BEAM
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
1.2
Deflection (in)
Figure 1: Load vs deflection for all three types of beams
CONCLUSION
Restate the importance and purpose of the lab and answer the questions posed.
What do the graphs, data collected, and calculated values tell us? Show important
numerical values and explain what they mean. Compare and contrast numerical values.
State whether or not the results were what you had expected. If not, theorize as to why
the results were different than expected. Discuss three possible errors in the
experiment supported by numerical values if possible.
Coarse & Fine Aggregate
ASTM C127-12, ASTM C128-12, C566-13
Introduction
Coarse aggregate is a broad term that includes gravels, crushed stone, aircooled blast furnace slag (which is a byproduct of ore refinement), and even
pulverized concrete. It is loosely defined as being predominately larger
than 4.75 mm in diameter (#4 Sieve). Coarse aggregate is most commonly
used in concrete but can also be used as a porous sub grade material.
Aggregates increase the economy of concrete as the cost is roughly a
quarter of the cost of cement. Knowing the moisture content, absorption,
and specific gravities of coarse aggregate in different moisture states is
essential for its correct use. The testing procedures and specifications
outlining these testable properties are defined by 2013 ASTM standards.
Fine aggregate is widely used by civil engineers as it includes sand, gravel,
crushed stone, slag and pulverized concrete. It is generally smaller than
4.75 mm in diameter (#4 sieve) and predominately retained on the #200
sieve. Fine aggregate is used in concrete and asphalt. It is more economical
than cement, provides dimensional stability, and helps to decrease dry
shrinkage. Knowing the moisture content, absorption content, and specific
gravity of coarse aggregate is essential for its correct use. The testing
procedures and specifications outlining these testable properties are
defined by 2013 ASTM standards.
Theory
Aggregate can be in one of four possible different moisture states:
1.) Natural state is simply the sample is in its source condition, some
moisture from the storage site may be present.
2.) Dry state occurs when the pores and the surface of the aggregate
have been given adequate time in an oven such that all water not
chemically bound has been evaporated.
3.) Saturated Surface Dry occurs when the pores are full of moisture and
additionally; for coarse aggregates it means there is no sheen of
water on the surface and for fine aggregates it means there is no
cohesion between un-compacted particles.
4.) Wet state occurs when the pores are full of water and there is a film
of water covering the aggregate.
Knowing the following properties of an aggregate sample is important to
developing a water to cement ratio in concrete since that number does not
include water that could be absorbed by aggregates. The relative density
numbers are different from bulk density (unit weight) because these values do
not consider the volume of air between the particles. Aggregates are
purchased according to their bulk density. The material is batched for
concrete using the specific gravity values.
Total Evaporable Moisture Content of Aggregate by Drying
ASTM C566-13 (2013)
Moisture % =
(WNAT − WNAT − DRY )
WNAT − DRY
x100
WNA T-DRY is the weight of the sample after it has been heat dried at a constant
temperature of 110oC and then allowed to cool for 1-3 hours. This is different
from W DRY in the following equations because Moisture Content is a separate
procedure.
Relative Density (Specific Gravity) Oven Dry
ASTM C127-12, C128-12
WDRY
SGOD =
(WSSD − WIN W ATER )
This value, when multiplied with the unit weight of water gives the unit weight
of the material as if the permeable voids of the particles contained just air.
Relative Density (Specific Gravity) Saturated Surface Dry
ASTM C127-12, C128-12
WSSD
SGSSD =
(WSSD − WIN W ATER )
This value, when multiplied with the unit weight of water gives the unit weight
of the material as if the permeable voids were completely filled with water.
Apparent Relative Density (Apparent Specific Gravity)
ASTM C127-12, C128-12
WDRY
ASG =
(WDRY − WIN W ATER )
This value, when multiplied with the unit weight of water gives the unit weight
of the material as if the material did not have permeable voids per volume.
Absorption Percentage of Aggregate
ASTM C127-12, C128-12
Absorption% =
(WSSD − WDRY )
WDRY
x100
Materials
1.) Oven Pan of known Weight (W PAN)
2.) #4 Sieve
3.) Bucket of Water with Controlled Constant Water Level
4.) Fixed Scale with Hanging Apparatus
5.) Oven
Fine Aggregates
6.) #200 Sieve
7.) Fine Aggregate Samples
8.) Copper Pail with Convex bottom and no holes
9.) Non-Absorbent Liner
10.) Small Metal Cone
11.) Tamper
Coarse Aggregate
6.) Coarse Aggregate Samples
7.) Wire Mesh Basket (#6 Sieve apertures or smaller)
8.) Absorbent towel
Procedure
Moisture Content
1. The coarse aggregate sample consists of what remains on the #4 sieve.
The fine aggregate sample consists of what passes through the #4 sieve
and is retained on the #200 sieve. Weigh an empty oven pan for each
prepared sample and record the weight. (W PAN)
2. Place each sample in an oven pan of known weight.
3. Weigh the aggregate samples in their natural states and subtract the
weights of the pans. (W NAT)
4. Dry the samples in the oven re-weigh and subtract the weight of the
pans. (W NAT-DRY )
Specific Gravities and Absorption Percentages
5. Saturate the samples for 24 hours in buckets of water.
6. Decant the water from the samples. The coarse aggregate sample
should be drained and then surface dried with an absorbent towel until
there is no sheen of water on the surface. The weight of this sample
should be taken in a pan of known weight which is subtracted and the
weight is recorded. (W SSD)
The fine aggregate should be spread over the non-absorbent liner. A
stream of air over the sample may be used to aid in the drying but the
sample needs to be continually mixed to avoid dry edges from occurring.
Continue drying until fine aggregate is in a free flowing condition. This
can take several hours.
a.) Hold the cone on a smooth non-absorbent surface and loosely
fill the mold with fine aggregate until it heaps over.
b.) Lightly tamp the fine aggregate with 25 light drops of the
hammer from approximately 0.2 inches above the aggregate
surface. Do not tap the sides or rim of the cone, start over if
this happens.
c.) Brush away any excess aggregate that has fallen around the
cone and lift the mold vertically. If the cone shape is held,
the material is known to have surface moisture remaining. Dry
the sample additionally using the method described in step 6
and then repeat from step 6 a-c, until only a nickel sized core
remains or one side at least (1/4) of the molded aggregate
slumps. The weight of the sample in this condition should be
taken in an oven pan of known weight which is subtracted.
(W SSD)
7. Suspend the wire basket from a fixed scale using a thin wire (or fishing
line). The basket should hang into a bucket of water with an overflow
hose or other means of keeping the water level constant when the
aggregate is added. Make sure the basket and handle are completely
submerged. Tare out the weight of the wire basket in water. Add the
coarse aggregate to the basket and agitate it so that all entrapped air is
removed. When the scale equalizes, record the weight. (W IN WATER)
Suspend the copper pail from a fixed scale using a thin wire (or fishing
line) and follow the same procedure with the fine aggregate. Record
the weight. (W IN WATER)
8. Decant the excess water and place sample in an oven pan of known
weight and oven dry for 24 hours. Record the weight minus the pan.
(W DRY )
Report
Create a table with all of the collected data and another table with all the
calculated results.
Answer the following questions in the discussion/conclusion section of the
report:
1.) What is the difference between moisture percentage and absorption
percentage?
2.) Why is it important to know the moisture and absorption percentages for
the aggregate?
3.) Why are the three Specific Gravity values different from either other?
Discuss three possible errors in the lab by identifying discrepancies between
calculated numerical property values for the same material and determining
which sample was likely to have been subjected to the suggested possible error
supported by the numerical data.
*USE OF NUMERICAL VALUES IS REQUIRED FOR FULL CREDIT*
Data Tables
Coarse Aggregate
Sample
1
2
W NAT (lbs)
W NAT-DRY (lbs)
W SSD (lbs)
W IN WATER (lbs)
W DRY (lbs)
Fine Aggregate
Sample
W NAT (lbs)
W NAT-DRY (lbs)
W SSD (lbs)
W IN WATER (lbs)
W DRY (lbs)
1
2
Coarse Aggregate (Data)
Sample
1
2
WNAT (lbs)
1.6119
2.0256
WNAT-DRY (lbs)
1.6101
2.0241
WSSD (lbs)
2.3253
2.0572
WIN WATER (lbs)
1.5
1.125
WDRY (lbs)
2.3118
2.0473
Coarse Aggregate (Results)
Sample
Moisture (%)
SGOD
SGSSD
ASG
Absorption (%)
1
2
Fine Aggregate (Data)
Sample
1
2
WNAT (lbs)
2.2758
1.7488
WNAT-DRY (lbs)
2.2742
1.7473
WSSD (lbs)
1.6518
1.7105
WIN WATER (lbs)
1.0625
1.3125
WDRY (lbs)
1.6312
1.6988
Fine Aggregate (Results)
Sample
Moisture (%)
SGOD
SGSSD
ASG
Absorption (%)
1
2

Purchase answer to see full
attachment

The above question has been answered by one of our experts. We can also create a unique answer for you From Scratch!

Note: This is a sample question posted by one of our clients. If you would like to have a unique, plagialism free paper,click the "Order Now" button below to get started.

Answer Ratings: